Sonic Youth Gossip

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johnnywinternoshow 06.19.2009 07:59 PM

Thanks for the beefheart stuff, atsonicpark

sarramkrop 07.04.2009 10:08 AM

Various - The Gift Of Noise


 

The Gift Of Noise subtitled Compilation Of Five New Underground American Bands is an album ranging from synth-punk to noise punk-rock. Psyclones is a long standing band with a diverse sound ranging from punk / post-rock / synth-pop to electronic industrial / ambient. Psyclones are Brian Ladd and Julie Frith of the well known label Ladd-Frith. Senseless Hate anyone any info? F/i are From Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and has been around since 1981, releasing half a dozen LP's on RRRecords. The band started out as a unit elaborating on noise structures in the tradition of Throbbing Gristle or Nurse With Wound. They are also influenced by Hawkwind and Spacemen 3. No Trend surfaced in the Washington, DC area in the early 1980's. They were associated with the underground hardcore punk scene of the time, but were not accepted by the cliques that existed. They didn't care, either. No Trend viewed all cliques, even the ones that supposedly consisted of rebels, as conformist and ridiculous. The insert for their first 7", which contains numerous clippings from teen magazines about how to dress "punk," is all the clue one needs as to how they felt about the "scene." Rumor has it that they used to invite members of the DC hardcore scene to their shows, and then place airport runway lights on stage facing the audience. There excellent first album "Too Many Humans..." and the lp with Lydia Lunch " A Dozen Dead Roses" can be found on Phoenix Hairpins. Smersh was Mike Mangino and Chris Shepard. And from 1981 until 1994 they released far too many cassette tapes. They also contributed to far too many compilations throughout the known world. In the early eighties they established a unique sound that is known and loved, combining cheap electronics and wild guitar sounds with distorted vocals. They were in fact a bit The Ramones of the industrial scene. But were they industrial? The Smersh sound had so many faces that it is next to impossible to categorize their music. Smersh recorded on most Monday evenings for a couple of hours. Each song was improvised over the course of the evening and then recorded. Once it was finished they never played it again. They never rehearsed, they couldn't read music, and they never played live. The Gift Of Noise was released on vinyl by L'Invitation au Suicide (ID 5) in 1983.


Tracks:


1. Psyclones - The Gift Of Noise
2. Psyclones - Rockin' The Cong
3. Senseless Hate - Vengeance Of God
4. Senseless Hate - In My Chair
5. F/i - Stepping Stone
6. F/i - Frat Boy
7. No Trend - Mass Sterilization Caused By Venereal Disease
8. No Trend - Cancer
9. No Trend - Teen Love
10. Smersh - She Is Nervous
11. Smersh - The Exorcissy


http://thethingonthedoorstep.blogspo...-of-noise.html
The Gift Of Noise

sarramkrop 07.04.2009 10:40 AM

Yoshimi – “Speaker/Tuna Power” 7″


http://sector2814.files.wordpress.co...pg?w=495&h=371
Boredoms/Free Kitten/Ooioo drummer does vanity record for Thurston Moore’s vanity label, back in 1993. that about sumsthis one up
http://sector2814.wordpress.com/

sarramkrop 07.04.2009 10:41 AM

Mev – “Live 94″ 7″


http://sector2814.files.wordpress.co...pg?w=495&h=371
about 12 minutes of live improv from the 1994 incarnation of this well-known and long-standing improv ensemble. Musica Elettronica Viva!

fugazifan 07.04.2009 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sarramkrop
CHARLES IVES CONCORD SONATA JOHN KIRKPATRICK
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_1LmEu7Uyg1...1600/front.jpg


Wild and beautiful recording of Ives' masterwork by John Kirkpatrick, who, in 1939, gave the first public performance of the piece - which had been lying around unplayed since Ives finished it in 1915. Kirkpatrick spent years discussing the sonata with its composer. When asked about sections of Emerson and Hawthorne labeled "(prose)", Ives explained that it meant "not to be evenly played... the tempo is not precise. It is not intended that the metrical relation 2:1 be held too literally." When asked about the countless pencil revisions he'd added to the sonata's privately printed first edition in the years following his first heart attack in 1918, Ives said, "Do whatever seems natural or best to you, though not necessarily the same way each time." As for the variants he improvised every time he sat down to play it, Ives confessed, "I don't know as I ever shall write them out, as it may take away the daily pleasure of... seeing it grow." After Ives' death in 1954, Kirkpatrick became curator of the Charles Ives Archive at Yale, cataloguing thousands of pages of manuscripts, even piecing together fragments of torn pages. He was first to record the sonata in 1945, returning to Columbia for its stereo debut in 1968. Of the three or four recordings I've heard, this one seems to best convey Ives' fearless egalitarianism, subverting conservatory-trained propriety with a shot of Thelonious Monk.

CHARLES IVES CONCORD SONATA JOHN KIRKPATRICK
COLUMBIA MASTERWORKS MS 7192 (1968)
01 Emerson 13.35
02 Hawthorne 10.02
03 The Alcotts 4.37
04 Thoreau 9.43

@ 320
http://rapidshare.com/files/23122730...irkpatrick.rar

i cant beleive missed this ives post. thanks!
have you heard his 4th symphony? its one of my favorites.

i am in an arabic music faze
so i found a few really good blogs today.
http://www.passionate-music.com/sear...Arabic%20Oldie (unfortunatly all the farid al atrach links are broken)
but this site has a few albums of this guy called - omar khorshid
who play arabic guitar and is a direct influence apparently on sir richard bishop and especially the freak of araby album which features a cover of one of omar's songs from the first album.
they SRBFOA is also in his top friends on myspace as well
http://www.passionate-music.com/2008...ic-guitar.html

there is also a ton of oum kalthoum and whatnot there

this has more classic arabic pop but like warda but also a really good oum kalthoum album and a realy good asmahan album
http://tabbouchemusic.blogspot.com/s...label/Classics

and this site i ddnt get much other than a nice george michel solo oud album
http://folkmusicsmb.blogspot.com/sea...eorge%20Michel

thats it for now.

i do have a request though, if anybody has any farid al atrach, or knows aof a site where i can download his stuff, especially the album addi errabi, that would be great. i couldnt even find it for sale on the internet.

my friend, whos an arab said that shell take me to the arab marketplace in the old city sometime this week, to look for farid al atrache cds. so i hope i can find something there.

verme (prevaricator) 07.06.2009 04:32 PM

Kluster & Friends 1969-1973 - 6xLP Boxset



 

Kluster and Friends - 1969-1973

6xLP Boxset
Qbico Records (Italy 2009)

Wow, a seriously amazing unearthed holy grail of early germany experimental proto-industrial/noise...


6 Lps of early Kluster shows pre and post Rodelius and Mobius. Conrad Schnitzler unearthed all these live recordings as a gift to Qbico Records for their supposed final release by the label. And what a gift it is!


As far as we know many online sellers have some copies still available. I seriously recommend if you love Kluster to pick this before its gone and selling on ebay for much more than the retail price.


All the Lp's in the box are in Black Sleeves with no information on the Black Labels. I've titled the Lp's by the unique name on the hub of each Lp. (ASA, Beta, CVS, DAV, EX, & Fungi!)


The audio fidelity of these live recordings is really incredible. Especially when you consider what time period these shows where recorded!


Highly Recommended!!!!
Vinyl Rip by your truly.





 

Qbico Label Notes: Here is a big one for you Qbico is going out with a BIG!!! BIG!!! BANG!!! When i mailed the news about the closure of qbico in 2010, some friends and musicians wrote me back... one was Conrad Schnitzler wondering if i wanna close with THE BOMB ! i said "yes, why not !?". so Con sent me 6 CD-R of UNRELEASED Kluster music, rec. in 1969-73 (along with Klaus Freudigmann and Wolfgang Seidel) ! he said to choose yr favourite 40 (+/-) from the 1 hour lenght of each CD-R, so to adjust to vinyl format... well, that's was one of the most joyful experience of my life ! this 6LP box collect that music which it's simply some of the most outstanding and revolutionary music that i ever heard !!! One of the most legendary release on Qbico ?! YES (screaming)!






 

Conrad Schnitzlerl about Kluster:
"Kluster was never over. There is KLUSTER until today. If we friends met, we didn't think about, under which name we met. It is the style of the music which comes out. No other group made such music. This is Kluster-music,it is a style. It is an invention of Konrad Schnitzler 1969 Schnitzler / Freudigmann / Seidel & Friends, was before Achim Roedelius came to the band and after.


I founded the music group Kluster after my exit 1969 from the group GERÄUSCHE (Zodiak with A.Roedelius and Boris Schak). Between 1969 to 1972 I worked with different friends, with Tangerine Dreams among others. With them I tried to perform the music of my imagination. Finally Klaus Freudigmann and Wolfgang Seidel remained at the work continuously over the years. In addition there were several actions with A.Roedelius and D.Möbius where the LPs KLUSTER Klopfzeichen,Osterei and Eruption were made. Instruments, amplifier and effects I gave D. Moebius because he had had no own equipment. I didn't want the music to remind of the normal. My criterias were not folk music, not rock music, not pop songs and not dance music. The idea for "Cluster" later "Kluster"(I wanted to avoid Americanisms) is not only a name for a group but a form of music. I had amplifier, instruments, contact mikes and effects, that could used by the others, too. Klaus had tape machines and microphones. In addition he constructed instruments and electronical sound generators, which made the most undescribable sounds. Wolfgang had everything connected with drum and base and in addition amplifier and effects.



Klaus had rooms where we could work out our music performances. The tapes "Electric Meditation" with TD were made in one of those spaces. Most of the performances happened with friends who took part in the actions; therefore Conrad, Klaus,Wolfgang and friends. For special activities we used the name ERUPTION. The idea was to make sounds without melodies, sounds comparing to industrial noises. I had different friends with me to play. No money was to be earned with this music. No fame, to attain with it. By the way I'm not a musician; I'm an intermedial artist and composer. With the different Kluster groups we did some live concerts. 'Eruption' (Ausbruch) is the title of the LP. Of that I had produced an edition of 100 LPs. Later the Gallery Block had made another edition of 100 LPS of it for the 'Block Box' with a label without Moebius' and Roedelius' names though. Later in 1996 Joe (Marginal Talent) produced a CD of it. I The group `Kluster- was a conglomerate of total different players and artists over several years. But all those years Klaus Freudigmann was involved sometimes as player, or as sound engineer or even as inventor of instruments. It was him, who taped the last Kluster Concert. Therefore he was named equally to the others on the label. After and previously off the splitting from R+M. I still did a lot of activities with the group Kluster there was Kluster befor and after Achim Roedelius+Dieter Moebius It was not popular music Kluster did. Not many people were interested. Therefore, No photos of Kluster, or posters, or tickets, or newspaper cuttings, or anything related left. It is about 35 years ago."






 

Wolfgang Seidel about Kluster: "Summer of Love? Kluster was formed in West-Berlin - much closer to Siberia than to San Francisco, Haight Ashbury and Golden Gate Park. What came to Berlin with a two years delay were only the outer fringes of the "Summer of Love". Its blossom would have died soon in the Cold War breeze. And 1970 a lot of the optimism of the mid 60ies had already ceased. It became obvious that creating a better world needs more than flowers in your hair. But the political movements of the late sixties were a child of the same optimism that fuelled the rapid developments changing not only the material side of life but also arts, music and the way people interacted. The new left and the hippie movement where all these ideas concentrated wasn't the result of poverty but build on the belief that with modern technology there is enough for everybody. It's only a question of a fair distribution.


That optimism had a soundtrack that was based on the same technology. From the electric guitar, reverb and echo units to the first synthesizers, everything was welcome that sounded as if it came from the future. Future meant space travel - so it's quite natural that the first effects wildly used where those who send you to a space you've never been before: artificial reverb and echo. A lot of people had their first encounter with this new music at the movies - watching scifi-film like Forbidden Planet with the electronic tonalities of Louis and Bebe Barron (1956 - and their work wasn't called music to avoid paying royalties and having to quarrel with the conservative musicians trade unions). For a few years rock music was the most popular of new sounds and for a lot of people the door opener. It was one of the rare moments when you could be at the same time avant-garde and mainstream. But this did not last long. Pop music quickly became old music with new instruments when it turned into highly standardized entertainment. And the use of the electric guitar developed rules like any other traditional instrument.


Amongst that people that met to form Kluster were Klaus Freudigmann and Wolfgang Seidel, who both grew disenchanted with pop music and Conrad Schnitzler who came from a complete different direction as sculptor. While the others discovered the new territories of sound via psychedelic music Schnitzler was a fan of Stockhausen, Cage etc. but was distracted by the highbrowed elite attitude with which this music surrounded itself in Germany. What met was the self empowerment of early rock music with the search for new sounds and structures of 20th century avant-garde music.



verme (prevaricator) 07.06.2009 04:33 PM

That Kluster made simple music on DIY instruments, droning and banging on one note for half an hour, did not mean we were into any kind of primitivism. We hated the bongo playing hippie and his backward dreams of tribal 'healthy' societies (forgetting that hunger, war and oppression were not invented this year). To us the longing for sweet melodies was a regressive refuge from a world that isn't sweet. We did not want to go back. If the future was inevitable, we wanted to shape it - at least sonically. That we preferred slow tempos sometimes gets mistaken as 'dark'. We just gave every sound enough time to be listened to. And we wanted to draw a line between us and the 'look I am the fastest' guitar heroes that began to rule the stages. What we did was getting rid of the schemes of pop and popular classic and find out, what else we can do with our tools, polishing and lubricating them for a future music.

But no matter how far your mind is in the future - your stomach is still on earth and demands feeding. When things got tougher in the 70ies, the people that met under the labels Kluster and Eruption had to look for ways to earn their living. Conrad Schnitzler started his long solo voyage, Klaus Freudigmann took part in the squatter’s movement, and others took ordinary jobs and surfaced now and then with some new piece of music. What's left are some tapes and a few minutes of film documenting an installation Conrad Schnitzler sat up at Galerie Block (1970) reflecting the ideas behind Kluster. Violins that had bought cheap from the flea market were equipped with contact microphones and plugged into radios that had been mounted to the wall as amplifiers. The visitors (hopefully no musicians) experimented collective with the sounds from the violins hearing themselves in the radio."


Download all zip files and put in a folder together,
Kluster.pt 1.zip
Kluster.pt 2.zip
Kluster.pt 3.zip
Kluster.pt 4.zip
Kluster.pt 5.zip
Kluster.pt 6.zip

Savage Clone 07.06.2009 04:35 PM

w h o a.
THANK YOU.

sarramkrop 07.08.2009 04:51 AM

nice one, jico. many thanx.

fugazifan - i haven't heard that.

atsonicpark 07.08.2009 05:36 AM

thanks verme. first thing i've downloaded in a while.

fugazifan 07.08.2009 03:39 PM

ASP you should really DL the omar khorshid albums
sir richard bishop but authentic.... youd really like it

Florya 07.08.2009 05:09 PM

Many thanks verme!

Fantastic post!

Decayed Rhapsody 07.08.2009 08:31 PM

TWINK - Think Pink
 

http://rapidshare.com/files/14207208...Think_Pink.rar

A landmark of English 60's psychedelia. The guitar work is great- thick and sprawling and almost Sonic Youth-y on certain tracks (Tiptoe, Fluid). Truly an underexposed gem, unless you're a total record nerd. Sounds nothing like The Pretty Things or yr average Steve Peregrin Took track (who wrote 2 of the songs on this album to Marc Bolan's chagrin. Took gave them to Twink after Bolan rejected them from Tyrannosaurus Rex).

http://wcpaebelectricflower.blogspot...ychedelic.html

Quote:

Twink's real name was John Alder. In 1963 he drummed for a Colchester band, Dane Stephens and The Deep Beats, who later changed their name to The Fairies in 1964, when they signed to Decca.

By 1967, Alder assumed the name Twink and resurfaced in Tomorrow. He was then involved in The Pretty Things, playing on their S.F. Sorrow album in 1968, but by 1969 he'd left them too to form an early Pink Fairies line-up with Mick Farren and Steve Peregrin Took (from Tyrannosaurus Rex). He'd also recorded the above solo album with assistance from several musicians, including Took and various members of The Deviants. Twink sings as well as drums on the album, which is a mixture of his own songs (including some instrumentals) and poems. It is a very significant disc in the wilderness of British psychedelia. Its highlights included the opening cut, The Coming Of The Other One, with its Eastern-sounding gongs, bongos, sitars, backward tapes and sighs and screams; The Sparrow Is The Sign and Thousand Words In A Cardboard Box. It wasn't actually released until 1970, though. It is now very collectable but some copies were pressed on red vinyl and these are now ultra-rare. In 1970, Twink also formed Pink Fairies as a more stable unit with Mick Farren, but by mid-1971 Twink had left the group and shortly afterwards left the country too.

In 1972, he formed an outfit called Stars with Syd Barrett and bassist Jack Monk (ex-Delivery). They only lasted for half a gig before Barrett wandered off the stage - indeed, they must be a contender for one of the shortest-lived bands in history. Having married in 1974, Twink returned to the music scene in the late seventies but that is beyond the time span of this book. ("The Tapestry of Delights", Vernon Joynson)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
John Charles Alder is Twink. Born in November 29, 1944 he was a prominent member of the U.K. Psychedelic scene in the late 60's and early 70's.

His first appearance was in 1963 as a member of the Rhythm and Blues Colchester-based DANE STEPHENS AND THE DEEP BEATS. The next year, they signed to Decca Records and changed their name to THE FARIES. They only made three singles through the band's existence. Rumor has it that the band were sent gifts and John Alder, "having long curly hair, regularly received bottles of Twink brand home perm lotion. It was at this time that he adopted TWINK as his stage name." They disbanded in 1965.

The same year THE FARIES disbanded Twink moved to London where he joined the Soul group THE IN-CROWD which later changed its name to TOMORROW. TOMORROW was one of the leading bands in the U.K. Psychedelic scene along with Pink Floyd and Soft Machine. They only managed to release one album in 1968 before disbanding.

Twink later went and joined THE PREETY THINGS and managed to release one album with the band before leaving in 1969.

In the middle of 1969, Twink started to work on his solo album, "Think Pink", with the help of some friends like Paul Randolph from THE DEVIANTS, Steve Peregrine Took from TYRANNOSAURUS REX, John Wood from TOMORROW and Wally Allen,John Povey from THE PREETY THINGS. Mick Farren from THE DEVIANTS recorded the album. The album was released in 1970.

The recording sessions of his solo album Twink, Peregrine and Farren went and created THE PINK FARIES. The line-up didn't last long and Mick Farren left the band after an argument. TWINK later formed another line-up and released one album before leaving the band in 1971, but he returned in 1975 and recorded an EP in 1977 and in 1987 for a reunion tour.

After leaving THE PINK FARIES in 1971-72 he moved to Cambridge where he formed the band STARS with Syd Barret and Jack Monk. The band was short lived. Syd Barret walked offstage during their first live appearance and never came back.

Twink was also a member of THE RINGS after an injury caused by a car crash. He was the vocalist for the band and released and album in 1977.

When touring with THE PINK FARRIES in their reunion tour in late 1980's Twink made a collaboration with PLASTICLAND and recorded one album with them which was released in 1989.

Twink released his second solo album in 1990 called "Mr. Rainbow".(http://www.progarchives.com/)

Track Listings:
1. The Coming Of The One (3:37)
2. Ten Thousand Words In A Cardboard Box (4:31)
3. Dawn Of Magic (1:43)
4. Tiptoe On The Highest Hill (5:23)
5. Fluid (4:04)
6. Mexican Grass War (5:29)
7. Rock And Roll The Joint (2:46)
8. Suicide (4:26)
9. Three Little Piggies (3:15)
10. The Sparrow Is A Sign (2:23)

Line-up/Musicians:
- Twink
- Paul Randolph
- Wally Allen
- John Povey
- Steve Peregrine Took
- John Wood

verme (prevaricator) 07.09.2009 02:44 PM

Quote:

There are no Decayes LP's in print anywhere in the world, to my knowledge. All of them are long gone, out-of-print etc. "Ich Bin Ein Spiegelei" was pressed in an edition of about 100 copies in 1978. All of the "Made in the USA" LP's were on my own "Imgrat" label (Imgrat = Immediate Gratification). I pressed an LP at each of the two New Zealand pressing plants, for the last two.


 
 




Ich Bin Ein Spiegelei (Imgrat 2400 001) 100 copies, 1978 (probably the most experimental one; as teenagers, we worshipped Faust, Zappa, early Kraftwerk - this is all we could come up with in our bedrooms!) This album is only Ron Kane (guitar, etc) & Paul Sakrison (drums, clarinet etc). Produced by Jordan Shroyer.


I went to England for the first time in September 1979 and met Steve Stapleton (who was still living with his mother, I believe) and Hemen (who was also on the first NWW, I think). In 1980, Hemen visited me in L.A., having made (or about to make) his "Hastings of Malawi" LP (called "Vibrant Stapler Obscures Characteristic Growth" on the Papal Products label).

Somehow (probably from Intergalactic Trading Co. in Portland, Oregon USA) Steve had obtained our first LP "Ich Bin Ein Spiegelei" and really liked it. I conmfess I was surprised that he put our name on the debut NWW LP (I think he gave me copy number "C6" of 500). Our LP was recorded at my home between 1975 and 1978, it consisted of two long instrumentals, with some comedy bits at the beginning or end of either track. Our big influence was Lard Free, the French avant-garde band (on the same trip that I met Steve and Hemen, I went to France and met and became friendly with Gilbert artman and his manager, Gilles Yepremian, who I know to this very day!). It's true, we were listening to a lot of German 'kosmische' music, but we were amateur musicians, very limited ability - the sounds on our records were only what we could wrench out of our instruments (in other words, we weren't musically capable of imitating *anybody*). I've heard our music called 'progressive' and even 'psychedelic' -you'll have to hear & it tell me what *you* think it is!


Steve and I had a lot of similar tastes in those days. We were both huge Basil Kirchen fans (in fact, Hemen gave me my copy of the wonderful "Worlds Within Worlds" LP on EMI-Columbia!). We were also both fond of Robert Wood, the American vibraphonist living in France. The best thing Steve turned me on to in 1979 was the world of Trevor Wishart, the avant-garde musician working of the university of York, I believe - "Beach Singularity" was the really good, as I recall.

Hope you find some of this shit interesting


Ron Kane


http://rapidshare.com/files/14160792..._Spiegelei.rar

Savage Clone 07.09.2009 03:26 PM

I sold an original pressing of that Twink LP for a pretty good sum once.
Great album!

verme (prevaricator) 07.27.2009 02:29 PM

People - Ceremony / Buddha Meet Rock (1971)

 
Ceremony / Buddha Meet Rock
Style: Psych-Rock
Label: Lover Creation

Psychedelic rock from Japan. Vinyl release from 1971, from what I hear it's extremely hard to find, but has been reissued. This is the original vinyl rip.

I’m not sure if these guys actually existed as a performing band, or if they were only a studio super-session project. Guitarist Kimio Mizutani had previously [or simultaneously, or shortly after?] played with Love Live Life + One and Masahiko Satoh’s Sound Brakers . At any rate, their sole album, the concept piece ‘Ceremony – Buddha Meet Rock’ [Teichiku, 1971], is an absolute classic. The album came with extensive liner notes elaborating on the intended meaning for each track – the whole album flowing more or less as a conceptual whole. As the title would suggest, it was an attempt to fuse a Buddhist-influenced spiritual vibe into an innovative oriental form of hypnotic psychedelic progressive rock. It’s all quite unique and doesn’t sound like any preceding groups that I’m aware of, though some bits are like a much less-heavy Flower Travellin’ Band circa ‘Satori’. It’s a bit jazzy in places, hinting at some of Stomu Yamash’ta’s work with Come to the Edge. There’s lots of nice fuzz guitar leads and overall, a very sanctified vibe that makes this a deep but groovy experience. Following this , Mizutani recorded his equally great solo album. - Aural Assault

One of the gems I discovered after reading Julian Cope's Japrocksampler, this is up there with Satori in the canon of 1970's Japanese psychedelia. Original vinyl copies of this go for $5,000.

http://www.mediafire.com/?5u1tkokhrom

sarramkrop 07.27.2009 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nefeli
THANK YOU ALL!


Stomu Yamash'ta & Masahiko Satoh - Metempsychosis (1971)

Sunday, June 14, 2009



#fullpost{display:inline;}
 



















January 27, 1971
Nippon Columbia Studio, Tokyo, Japan

Composed by Satoh, and recorded with Satoh on piano, Yamash'ta on
percussion and Miyama Toshiyuki & New Herd Orchestra on everything else.

Miyama Toshiyuki & the New Herd Orchestra:

Bass [Electric] - Masaaki Ito
Drums - Isao Yomoda
Engineer [Recording] - Yoshihiko Kannari
Producer - Takeshi Fujii
Saxophone [Alto] - Isao Kimura, Kazumi Oguro
Saxophone [Baritone] - Shigeru Hirano
Saxophone [Tenor] - Mamoru Mori, Seiji Inoue
Trombone - Masamichi Uetaka, Takahide Uchida, Takashi Hayakawa, Teruhiko Kataoka
Trumpet - Shin Kazuhara, Kazumi Takeda, Shuji Atsuta, Yoshikazu Kishi

Download


Thanks!

Semperet 07.28.2009 07:24 AM

Wow. What a coincidence. Just got Satoh's Amalgamation a couple of days ago. Stuff's pretty hard to track down at times. Thanks.

sarramkrop 08.23.2009 11:39 AM

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_y35XeAsqK6...1600/cover.jpg
V/A - Another Damned Seattle Compilation (1991, Dashboard Hula Girl)
Back in 1991 when this disk saw the light of day, I would have bought damn near anything adorned with the Mudhoney moniker affixed to it. They were my primary motivation for obtaining this long out of print location-specific Damned tribute album, and as often is the case with compilations, I got a lot more than I bargained for including a greater appreciation of the band it was dedicated too. Mudhoney's lightning fast redo of "Stab Your Back," satisfied as much as I had anticipated, but I was even more floored when Flop's rendition of "Disco Man" came blasting out two songs later. Skin Yard's tackling of "Machine Gun Etiquette" erupts with whiplash fury from second one and doesn't relent one iota thereafter. Killer. Nirvana and Soundgarden may be absent here, but much of Seattle's indie creme de la creme is present and accounted for - The Posies, Fastbacks, Love Battery, Gas Huffer, and Young Fresh Fellows (the latter appearing twice, including their choice of "Life Goes On," an obscurity from the Damned's not oft heard Strawberries album). Virtual unknowns lost to the mists of time like Freak, Big Satan Inc, and Whitey do fine takes of "Antipope," "Melody Lee," and "Wait for the Blackout," respectively. Lots of Damned, Damned, Damned and Machine Gun Etiquette material is covered here, but lesser known albums (like the aforementioned Strawberries) are represented too. Most amazingly, who would have guessed in '91 that the Damned would still be cranking out records and touring?

01. The Purdins - 1 of the 2
02. Young Fresh Fellows - Fan Club
03. Coffin Break - Love Song
04. Skin Yard - Machine Gun Etiquette
05. Gas Huffer - Suicide
06. The Accused - Neat, Neat, Neat
07. Love Battery - I Just Can't Be Happy Today
08. Motorhoney - Psychomania
09. Freak - Antipope
10. Flop - Disco Man
11. Hammerbox - New Rose
12. Derelicts - Born to Kill
13. Gruntruck - Nasty
14. Mudhoney - Stab Your Back
15. The Posies - Smash It Up
16. Big Satan, Inc - Melody Lee
17. Whitey - Wait For The Blackout
18. Fastbacks - Hit Or Miss
19. Young Fresh Fellows - Life Goes On
http://rapidshare.com/files/26859003...ed_seattle.rar

loubarret 08.23.2009 12:01 PM

Many many thanks


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